OpenBSD Journal

OpenOffice.org?

Contributed by sean on from the some words just scream for processing dept.

Charlie Kinbote writes:
What is the current status of OpenOffice.org running under OpenBSD?
Is anyone working on a port?
Are there serious technical or licensing problems that discourage efforts toward an OpenBSD port?

Does the current Linux port of OO.o (v 1.1.2) execute using OpenBSD's Linux API? If so, is its performance satisfactory?

(Comments are closed)


Comments
  1. By Ray (209.120.187.2) ray@cyth.net on

    Comments
    1. By Michael Sullenszino (66.239.244.41) nospam@sullenszino.org on

      Just an addition which may seem obvious: make sure you also have emulators/redhat installed from the ports tree.

    2. By Anonymous Coward (134.58.253.130) on

      I have also been able to install OOo (linux emulation) system-wide this way.

      Just leave the --single option from install, and put a --prefix in there.

      Then run 'setup' as a regular user from where you installed it, to create some user-specific settings.

      Done :-)

    3. By Phil (199.243.65.6) on

      Did you install with java enable ? On i386 ?

  2. By mirabile (213.196.246.232) on

    Why don't you try it (the GNU port, that is)?

    As for the native: AFAIK there are only serious technical problems,
    but they're being solved. Nobody really cares about OpenOffice, though.

    (Btw, KOffice works.)

    Comments
    1. By kj (136.159.61.223) on http://pintday.org

      Yep. Nobody cares about office suites.

      Unless, of course, you actually function in the real world.

      Comments
      1. By Stephen Paskaluk (129.128.138.50) on

        Yep. Nobody cares about office suites.

        Unless, of course, you actually function in the real world.

        Heh, last I checked I was functioning in the real world without using any Office products ... but maybe that's just me. I'd venture to guess that there are many more people who use OpenBSD in the real world for it's server and developer tools than as a desktop. Even on the desktop an office suite isn't a necessity, thanks for sharing your sad attempt at making a point through sarcasm though.

        Comments
        1. By tedu (66.93.171.98) on

          so because you think it's better to use openbsd as a server, the rest of us should be denied the ability to run oo on obsd? i don't use oo, and i don't care to, but somewhere out there are people who like it, and maybe they would choose to use openbsd if it could run oo.

          Comments
          1. By Stephen Paskaluk (129.128.138.50) on

            so because you think it's better to use openbsd as a server, the rest of us should be denied the ability to run oo on obsd? i don't use oo, and i don't care to, but somewhere out there are people who like it ...

            That's not what I said at all. I said that an office application isn't necessary for using OpenBSD in the real world, and that the poster I responded to shouldn't have implied that only people useless in the real world don't need office applications. Personally I think it would be fine to have OO, but like many others I don't really care much.

            ... and maybe they would choose to use openbsd if it could run oo.

            I almost spilled my pop ... that is quite different from the usual stance on "I'd run OpenBSD if ..." ;-)

            Comments
            1. By mike (217.162.138.166) on

              a high percentage of the installed client machine base, that's any os, use mostly browsers, office suites and mail clients to get their daily work done.

              now, in the long term, would you prefer them to be running win + ie + m$office + oexpress or openbsd + oo + moz?

              Comments
              1. By Stephen Paskaluk (129.128.138.50) on

                a high percentage of the installed client machine base, that's any os, use mostly browsers, office suites and mail clients to get their daily work done.

                now, in the long term, would you prefer them to be running win + ie + m$office + oexpress or openbsd + oo + moz?

                Why do I care what people use. The simple fact of the matter is that office suites are not a necessary feature of an OS to be used in the real world. It might be nice, and/or helpful, but it's not necessary. Also, I said "... like many others I don't really care much" about OO. What does that have to do with browsers and mail clients. I don't care about OO (I might care a tiny bit if there weren't other office suites to use and other ways to get things done) and I'm not the only one. Is there something confusing about that?

                As for what people use, I don't care about that either. People should use what they want to use. No tool is so perfect that it should be used for everything, and I really don't see what this has to do with me not caring about Open Office working. If you mean that (for example) "we should all care about OO because it will help rid the world of Windows and Office" then, once again, I don't care.

                Comments
                1. By Dominic (38.115.176.130) on

                  Why do I care what people use. The simple fact of the matter is that office suites are not a necessary feature of an OS to be used in the real world. It might be nice, and/or helpful, but it's not necessary.

                  Okay, you have the right, not to care, but the sole goal of any OS is to be of use. And, if the OS is UNIX or LINUX based then the goal should be to displace Windows in the corporations. Free their minds. OpenBSD provides a means through a very secure environment.

                  Now, back to the part about office suites not being necessary - wrong. Unless you are content using a basic text editor, but to have more flexibility or better looking documents, for business or development documentation - a better text editor is needed, thus the argument for an office suite.

                  Also, I said "... like many others I don't really care much" about OO. What does that have to do with browsers and mail clients. I don't care about OO (I might care a tiny bit if there weren't other office suites to use and other ways to get things done) and I'm not the only one. Is there something confusing about that?

                  Yes, one minute you do not care completely and the next sentence you declare a retraction only if there are no other office suites - I think you are confused...

                  As for what people use, I don't care about that either. People should use what they want to use. No tool is so perfect that it should be used for everything, and I really don't see what this has to do with me not caring about Open Office working. If you mean that (for example) "we should all care about OO because it will help rid the world of Windows and Office" then, once again, I don't care.

                  Having the ability to choose what you want to use can only come from a need. You have the choice because someone out there made it happen and had people support them. So, enjoy your freedom of speech, but shut up and quit being no negative in this thread. You can either say you support it or you do not - get on with your life.

                  I personally would like to see OO work with OpenBSD because I find it useful and a potential decision maker for some people, not all, and being aware of the needs of people is what has made OpenBSD the best UNIX based OS, whether used for workstation or server.

                  Again, I personally am looking for the most secure workstation under the open source umbrella with a compatibility of an office suite. I loved the work that OpenBSD does, but am looking elsewhere because of the office suite ordeal. Who knows...is the compatibility issue the lack of knowledge? I would say yes, because I am not that well versed with tweaking Unix-based systems yet. So, in my right to freedom of speech - chill out man!

                  Comments
                  1. By Stephen Paskaluk (129.128.138.50) on

                    ... the sole goal of any OS is to be of use. And, if the OS is UNIX or LINUX based then the goal should be to displace Windows in the corporations. Free their minds. OpenBSD provides a means through a very secure environment.

                    I disagree. You seem to be unaware of an entire world of computer use outside of the Windows based PC. It has also been stated many times that the goal of OpenBSD is to enjoy hacking the system. I'm sure the developers like it when others find their work useful, but many of them have stated (IIRC and paraphrased) that they aren't trying for world domination. Note that I'm not in any way claiming to speak for the OpenBSD project, but I've been following OpenBSD mailing lists and newsgroups for a few years and this is the impression I've received

                    Now, back to the part about office suites not being necessary - wrong. Unless you are content using a basic text editor, but to have more flexibility or better looking documents, for business or development documentation - a better text editor is needed, thus the argument for an office suite.

                    Again, you are ignoring a wide view of computer systems and choosing to focus on the stereotypical desktop use. For general documentation text files, man pages and simple html documents are all generally sufficient, and TeX can be used for many more complicated documents. I acknowlege that office suites can be of use here, but remember that I'm speaking about necessity. I think I said this before, I don't think office suites are useless, they're just unecessary IMHO.

                    Also, I said "... like many others I don't really care much" about OO. What does that have to do with browsers and mail clients. I don't care about OO (I might care a tiny bit if there weren't other office suites to use and other ways to get things done) and I'm not the only one. Is there something confusing about that?

                    Yes, one minute you do not care completely and the next sentence you declare a retraction only if there are no other office suites - I think you are confused...

                    The point that I felt was being confused was my statement about OO being taken to mean windows vs. OpenBSD desktop systems in general, which I don't feel is that closely tied to OO. To answer your statement directly, I have acknowleged that office suites can be useful and much of my justification for not caring about Open Office is that there are other alternatives to get things done. I'm not actively against having office suites, and even though I think they're unecessary it might be good to have something that offers that style of use. KOffice offers that, as do the GNOME based programs. If those programs didn't exist or work I'd care a little bit about the status of Open Office, as it stands now I don't. I also feel there was some confusion that led to a previous poster's question about windows, ie and outlook. I hope that clarifies my stance sufficiently.

                    As for what people use, I don't care about that either. People should use what they want to use. No tool is so perfect that it should be used for everything, and I really don't see what this has to do with me not caring about Open Office working. If you mean that (for example) "we should all care about OO because it will help rid the world of Windows and Office" then, once again, I don't care.

                    Having the ability to choose what you want to use can only come from a need. You have the choice because someone out there made it happen and had people support them.

                    I'm not sure what you're trying to get at with this statement. I realize it takes time and dedication to make things happen, and I have a great appreciation for that.

                    So, enjoy your freedom of speech, but shut up and quit being no negative in this thread. You can either say you support it or you do not - get on with your life.

                    I don't think saying "We have all the tools we need without Open Office" is all that negative, and most of this thread consists of me trying to clarify my statements to people who either misunderstand entirely or try to read too much into my words, much like yourself.

                    I personally would like to see OO work with OpenBSD because I find it useful and a potential decision maker for some people, not all, and being aware of the needs of people is what has made OpenBSD the best UNIX based OS, whether used for workstation or server.

                    Good for you. I also think that OpenBSD makes a good system for a workstation or server.

                    Again, I personally am looking for the most secure workstation under the open source umbrella with a compatibility of an office suite.

                    Again? This is the first time you've made this statement ;-) As for the compatibility of an office suite, OO isn't the only option.

                    I loved the work that OpenBSD does, but am looking elsewhere because of the office suite ordeal. Who knows...is the compatibility issue the lack of knowledge? I would say yes, because I am not that well versed with tweaking Unix-based systems yet. So, in my right to freedom of speech - chill out man!

                    I'm perfectly relaxed, I'm only trying to clear up some confusion about the statements I've made. Personally I think other people are getting a little hot under the collar about needing OO, but they're welcome to if they feel the need.

                    Comments
                    1. By Dominic (199.8.158.133) on

                      Nice post - I think we are on the same page, literally...

                      Comments
                      1. By imortality (203.167.87.134) on

                        DO any one here knows how to install/configure/port Openoffice on Openbsd?

    2. By Anonymous Coward (151.188.247.103) on

      > Why don't you try it (the GNU port, that is)?
      >
      > As for the native: AFAIK there are only serious technical problems,
      > but they're being solved. Nobody really cares about OpenOffice, though.
      >
      > (Btw, KOffice works.)

      Not with a lot of MS Office documents, no, KOffice doesn't work. This is especially true of complex MS Word documents like I see every day at work. That's why a lot of people out here do care about OpenOffice.org, and why it'd be great to see it on a secure platform like OpenBSD.

      More plans in action like OpenDocument in Massachusetts will eliminate the need for one specific package (OpenOffice.org) like this. We need to push OpenDocument...hard...over many years.

  3. By James Nobis (209.99.76.164) on

    use abiword and gnumeric They are both faster and a lot less buggy than OO. The only thing I use oo on my laptop (freebsd) for is powerpoint. Are there any stand alone power point apps?

    Comments
    1. By Thoren McDole (206.124.149.194) on slackology.net

      MagicPoint makes a nice powerpoint replacement.

      Comments
      1. By djm@ (61.95.66.134) on

        I love magicpoint, but a powerpoint replacement it isn't. It may be a superior substitute for some technical uses, but it doesn't let me view .pps files that people send me.

        Comments
        1. By Anonymous Coward (134.212.178.10) on

          strings(1) is often a good enough .pps viewer.

    2. By RC (4.16.255.65) on

      Abiword... ummm... well... okay.
      Gnumeric... no thanks. I prefer not having to install all of GNOME just to type up a spreadsheet.

      Same problem with KOffice.

      Comments
      1. By Anonymous Coward (203.177.60.222) on

        Gnumeric... no thanks. I prefer not having to install all of GNOME just to type up a spreadsheet.

        AFAIK you can install Gnumeric without installing all of GNOME components. And that same goes to components of KDE.

        Comments
        1. By RC (4.16.255.145) on

          > AFAIK you can install Gnumeric without installing all of GNOME

          Well, you don't have to install ALL of GNOME, per se, but you do have to install much of it...


          > And that same goes to components of KDE.

          No, definately not true. KOffice, Konq, et al, require kdelibs, kinit, etc. It's much worse than the GNOME-side, because you do need the large majority (if not absolutely everything) of KDE's components to get them working.

      2. By Anonymous Coward (69.197.92.181) on

        Abiword and gnumeric have the same dependancies, and gnome isn't in the list. It just uses gtk, like damn near everything.

        Comments
        1. By RC (4.16.255.145) on

          > Abiword and gnumeric have the same dependancies,
          > and gnome isn't in the list.

          How exactly did you come to that conclusion? I mean really... My original post says, very clearly, that is not the case, but you mindlessly assert that I am wrong. Here's a tip, when you believe what someone says is directly in opposition to the facts, take a few seconds to consider that you might just be the one who is completely wrong.

          Here, since you're blissful in your complete ignorance, and too lazy to spend a couple seconds to look it up, here it is. Copied and pasted from the Gnumeric website... Requirements:

          http://www.gnome.org/projects/gnumeric/download.shtml

          libgsf >= 1.10.1
          libxml2 >= 2.4.12 also known as gnome-xml
          glib >= 2.0.0
          atk >= 1.0.0
          pango >= 1.0.0
          gtk+ >= 2.0.0
          libgnome >= 2.0.0
          libgnomeui >= 2.0.0
          libonobo >= 2.0.0
          libbonoboui >= 2.0.0
          libgnomeprint >= 2.4.2
          libgnomeprintui >= 2.4.2
          libglade >= 2.0.0
          intltools >= 0.27.2


          Oh look, it doesn't just require GTK. It also requires numerous GNOME-only libs like pango, atk, lib-FREAKING-gnome, and many more. You couldn't have been more wrong if you TRIED. Yet you remain 100% confident about how wrong I must be... Strange.

    3. By Alexandre Ratchov (147.173.98.28) on

      you can also use prosper (a latex package) to make slides:

      http://prosper.sourceforge.net/

      Comments
      1. By Marc Espie (62.212.102.210) on

        people I know in the academics world currently use beaver.
        It seems it's very good for slides, much better than prosper
        ever was.

  4. By jon-d (12.73.160.149) on

    You may want to look at TextMaker, a commercial wordprocessor for Linux. It runs OK under OpenBSD. The install instructions are here: TextMaker install on OpenBSD

    Comments
    1. By sthen (81.168.66.229) on

      I haven't tried it on OpenBSD myself, but in general I can recommend TextMaker (and the PlanMaker spreadsheet from the same people) as reliable, lightweight and with high quality MS Office file compatibility.

  5. By The Warden (142.165.170.178) on

    I would have to agree. Having support for OO should be a priority. I find myself more and more using the office suite. Why, because it's required to produce professional documents to conduct business. Great advantage is presently it handles MS file formats. Any ways I haven't tried to use OO yet on OpenBSD but working towards setting up a OpenBSD workstation. So I'll see what I can learn about OO on OpenBSD. Is there any details as to the problems of OO running? I would possibly be interested in resolving the problem if I can.

    Comments
    1. By Jan-Uwe Finck (141.20.103.68) on

      In the meantime just use OpenOffice under Linux emulation - which runs just fine.

      I put the instructions from Ray (above) on a web page:
      http://www.gruebchen.org/openbsd/openoffice.html

      Maybe this helps some people.

    2. By Anonymous Coward (151.188.247.103) on

      > I would have to agree. Having support for OO should be a priority. I find myself more and more using the office suite. Why, because it's required to produce professional documents to conduct business. Great advantage is presently it handles MS file formats.

      <snipped>

      I agree. I work in a dyed-in-the-wool "Microsoft shop". AbiWord, Gnumeric, and KOffice are what I'd call "pretty good" with MS file formats. At home, "pretty good" is fine. But "pretty good" isn't good enough at work; I need something "really good" at handling all the wacky MS Office-formatted documents that people (including my bosses) expect me to work with as part of my job. Virtually perfect MS Office file format compatibility is basically required for remaining employed in the vast majority of workplaces in the United States, until something like OpenDocument becomes ubiquitous. We certainly should work to make that happen, but we're not there yet.

      The combination of OpenOffice.org, Evolution (for MS Exchange Server "groupware"), and Firefox allows me to be "Microsoft Free Since 2003" on all of my work computers. To do this, today I run GNU/Linux, and I am, sadly, the only one at work that does not have some sort of Windows PC. I'm proving that it can be done with Free Software, and I have been for the last three years. But I need near-perfect MS Office file format compatibility to do so. OpenOffice.org gives me that. No other Free Software office productivity package gives me that.

      *That* is a major impediment to OpenBSD on the corporate desktop. And it's fine if nobody cares; I already have GNU/Linux. But OpenBSD would be very nice in that capacity, too.

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